Barbecue grill

Barbecue grill

Jacksonville       Duval County                 904-346-1266
St Augustine      St Johns County             904-824-7144
Orange Park       Clay County                   904-264-6444
Jacksonville Beaches    Duval County      904-246-3969
Fernandina          Nassau County               904-277-3040
Macclenny          Baker County                 904-259-5091
Palm Coast         Flagler County                386-439-5290
Daytona              Volusia County               386-253-4911

Gainesville          Alachua County              352-335-8555

Serving all of Florida  and Georgia    at     904-346-1266

EMAIL LARRY@1STPROP.COM (feel free to email your bidding packages here)

 Gas Grills

Gas-fueled grills typically use propane (LP) or natural gas (NG) as their fuel source, with gas-flame either cooking food directly or heating grilling elements which in turn radiate the heat necessary to cook food. Gas grills are available in sizes ranging from small, single steak grills up to large, industrial sized restaurant grills which are able to cook enough meat to feed a hundred or more people. Gas grills are designed for either LP or NG, although it’s possible to convert a grill from one gas source to another.

The majority of gas grills follow the cart grill design concept: the grill unit itself is attached to a wheeled frame that holds the fuel tank. The wheeled frame may also support side tables and other features.

A recent trend in gas grills is for the manufacturers to add an infrared radiant burner to the back of the grill enclosure. This radiant burner provides an even heat across the burner and is intended for use with a horizontal rotisserie. A meat item (whole chicken, beef roast, pork loin roast) is placed on a metal skewer that is rotated by an electric motor. Smaller cuts of meat can be grilled in this manner using a round metal basket that slips over the metal skewer.

Another type of gas grill gaining popularity is called a flattop grill. According to Hearth and Home magazine, flattop grills “on which food cooks on a griddlelike surface and is not exposed to an open flame at all” is an emerging trend in the outdoor grilling market.[7]

A small metal “smoker box” containing wood chips may be used on a gas grill to give a smoky flavor to the grilled foods. Although, barbecue purists would argue that to get a true smoky flavor (and smoke ring) you have to cook low and slow, indirectly and using wood or charcoal. According to The Gas Grill Review and Ratings Guide gas grills are difficult to maintain at the low temperatures required (~225-250F), especially for extended periods.[8]

 Infrared Grills

Infrared grills work by igniting propane or natural gas to superheat a ceramic tile, causing it to emit an infrared radiation of a thermal radiation technique that cooks food. The thermal radiation is generated when heat from the movement of charged particles within atoms is converted to electromagnetic radiation in the infrared heat frequency range. The benefits are that heat is uniformly distributed across the cooking surface and that temperatures reach over 500 °C (900 °F), allowing users to sear items quickly.

Infrared cooking differs from other forms of grilling, which use hot air to cook the food. Instead of heating the air, infrared radiation heats the food directly. The benefits of this are a reduction in pre-heat time and less drying of the food. Grilling enthusiasts claim food cooked on an infrared grill tastes similar to food from char-grills. This is because charcoal, when burned, emits infrared radiation, the same as an infrared grill, but the difference is that char-grills cook with only about 25% infrared heat and the remaining 75% from convection (hot air). Proponents say that food cooked on infrared grills seems juicier. Also, infrared grills have the advantages of instant ignition, better heat control, and a uniform heat source.

This technology was previously patented, but the patents expired in 2000 and more companies have started offering infrared grills at lower prices.

 Charcoal

Charcoal grills use either charcoal briquets or all-natural lump charcoal as their fuel source. The charcoal, when burned, will transform into embers radiating the heat necessary to cook food.

There is contention among grilling enthusiasts on what type of charcoal is best for grilling. Users of charcoal briquets emphasize the uniformity in size, burn rate, heat creation, and quality exemplified by briquets. Users of all-natural lump charcoal emphasize the reasons they prefer it: subtle smoky aromas, high heat production, and lack of binders and fillers often present in briquets.

There are many different charcoal grill configurations. Some grills are square, round, or rectangular, some have lids while others do not, and some may or may not have a venting system for heat control. The majority of charcoal grills, however, fall into the following categories:

 Brazilian rodízio

The Brazilian Rodizio Machine Gas Grill, is a heavy duty spitroast machine for making the popular Brazilian “rodízio”. It works with top radiant gas burners which roasts the meat in rotating spits.

 Brazier

The simplest and most inexpensive of charcoal grills, the brazier grill is made of wire and sheet metal and composed of a cooking grid placed over a charcoal pan. Usually the grill is supported by legs attached to the charcoal pan. The brazier grill does not have a lid or venting system. Heat is adjusted by moving the cooking grid up or down over the charcoal pan. Brazier grills are available at most discount department stores during the summer.

Pellet Grill

Pellet grills are fueled by compressed hardwood pellets (sawdust compressed with vegetable oil at approx. 10k psi) that are loaded into a hopper and fed into a fire box at the bottom of the grill via an electric powered auger that is controlled by a thermostat. The pellets are lit by an electric igniter rod that starts the pellets burning and they turn into coals in the firebox once they burn down. Most pellet grills are a barrel shape with a square hopper box at the end or side.

The advantage of a pellet grill is that it can be set on a “smoke” mode where it burns at 100 to 150 degrees for slow smoking. It can be set at 180 to 300 to slow cook or BBQ meats (like brisket, ribs and hams) or cranked up to a max of 450 to 500 degrees for what would be considered low temp. grilling. It is one of the few “grills” that is actually a great smoker, a fantastic BBQ and a decent grill. Critics argue that a good “grill” should be able to exceed 500 degrees to sear the meat.

Most pellet grills burn 1/2 to 1 pound of pellets per hour at 180 to 250 degrees, depending on the “hardness” of the wood, ambient temp. and (of course) how often the lid is opened. Most hoppers hold 10 to 20 pounds of wood pellets. Pellets in a wide variety of woods (hickory, oak, maple, apple, alder, mesquite, grapevine, etc..) can be used or mixed for desired smoke flavoring.

Square Charcoal

The Square Charcoal grill is a hybrid of the brazier and the kettle grill. It has a shallow pan like the brazier and normally a simple method of adjusting the heat, if any. However, it has a lid like a kettle grill and basic adjustable vents. The square charcoal grille is, as expected, priced between the brazier and kettle grill, with the most basic models priced around the same as the most expensive braziers and the most expensive models competing with basic kettle grills. These grills are available at discount stores and have largely displaced most larger braziers. Square charcoal grills almost exclusively have four legs with two wheels on the back so the grill can be tilted back using the handles for the lid to roll the grill. More expensive examples have baskets and shelves mounted on the grill.

 Hibachi

The hibachi grill design originated in China but the name is a Japanese word which refers to a heating device not usually used for cooking. (For the purposes of this article, “hibachi” will refer to the cooking grill.) In its most common form, the hibachi is an inexpensive grill made of either sheet steel or cast iron and composed of a charcoal pan and two small, independent cooking grids. Like the brazier grill, heat is adjusted by moving the cooking grids up and down. Also like the brazier grill, the hibachi does not have a lid. Some hibachi designs have venting systems for heat control. The hibachi is a good grill choice for those who do not have much space for a larger grill, or those who wish to take their grill traveling.

 Kettle

The kettle grill is considered the classic American grill design It has remained one of the best and most reliable charcoal grill designs to date Smaller and more portable versions exist, such as the Weber Smokey Joe. The kettle grill is composed of a lid, cooking grid, charcoal grid, lower chamber, venting system, and legs. Some models include an ash catcher pan and wheels. The lower chamber that holds the charcoal is shaped like a kettle, giving the grill its name. The key to the kettle grills’ cooking abilities is its shape. The kettle design distributes heat more evenly. When the lid is placed on the grill, it prevents flare-ups from dripping grease, and allows heat to circulate around the food as it cooks. It also holds in flavor-enhancing smoke produced by the dripping grease or from smoking wood added to the charcoal fire.

The kettle design allows the griller to configure the grill for indirect cooking (or barbecuing) as well. For indirect cooking, charcoal is piled on one or both sides of the lower chamber and a water pan is placed in the empty space to one side or between the charcoal. Food is then placed over the water pan for cooking. The venting system consists of one or more vents in the bottom of the lower chamber and one or more vents in the top of the lid. Normally, the lower vent(s) are to be left open until cooking is complete, and the vent(s) in the lid are adjusted to control airflow. Restricted airflow means lower cooking temperature and slower burning of charcoal.

Cart

The charcoal cart grill is quite similar in appearance to a typical gas grill. The cart grill is usually rectangular in design, has a hinged lid, cooking grid, charcoal grid, and is mounted to a cart with wheels and side tables. Most cart grills have a way to adjust heat, either through moving the cooking surface up, the charcoal pan down, through venting, or a combination of the three. Cart grills often have an ash collection drawer for easy removal of ashes while cooking. Their rectangular design makes them usable for indirect cooking as well. Charcoal cart grills, with all their features, can make charcoal grilling nearly as convenient as gas grilling. Cart grills can also be quite expensive.

 Barrel

In its most primitive form, the barrel grill is nothing more than a 55 US gallons (210 l; 46 imp gal) steel barrel sliced in half lengthwise. Hinges are attached so the top half forms the lid and the bottom half forms the charcoal chamber. Vents are cut into the top and bottom for airflow control. A chimney is normally attached to the lid. Charcoal grids and cooking grids are installed in the bottom half of the grill, and legs are attached. Like kettle grills, barrel grills work well for grilling as well as true barbecuing. For barbecuing, lit charcoal is piled at one end of the barrel and food to be cooked is placed at the other. With the lid closed, heat can then be controlled with vents. Fancier designs available at stores may have other features, but the same basic design does not change.

 Ceramic cooker

The ceramic cooker design has been around for roughly 3,000 years The shichirin, a Japanese grill traditionally of ceramic construction, has existed in its current form since the Edo period however more recent designs have been influenced by the mushikamado now more commonly referred to as a kamado. Recently, the kamado ceramic cooker design has been made popular by the Grill Dome, Komodo Kamado, The Big Green Egg, and Primo. The ceramic cooker is just as versatile as the kettle grill but the ceramic chamber retains heat and moisture more efficiently. Ceramic cookers are equally adept at grilling, smoking, and barbecuing foods.

 Tandoor oven

A Tandoor is used for cooking certain types of Irani, Indian and Pakistani food, such as tandoori chicken. It is also known as a tonir in Armenian which is a widely used method of cooking barbecue. In Georgia it is called a tone and is used for cooking kebabs. In a tandoor, the wood fire is kept in the bottom of the oven and the food to be cooked is put on long skewers and inserted into the oven from an opening on the top so the meat items are above the coals of the fire. This method of cooking involves both grilling and oven cooking as the meat item to be cooked sees both high direct infrared heat and the heat of the air in the oven. Tandoor ovens often operate at temperatures above 500F and cook the meat items very quickly.

 Portable charcoal

The portable charcoal grill normally falls into either the brazier or kettle grill category. Some are rectangular in shape. A portable charcoal grill is usually quite compact and has features that make it easier to transport, making it a popular grill for tailgating. Often the legs fold up and lock into place so the grill will fit into a car trunk more easily. Most portable charcoal grills have venting, legs, and lids, though some models do not have lids (making them, technically, braziers.)

 Hybrids

A hybrid grill is a grill used for outdoor cooking with charcoal and natural gas or liquid propane and can cook in the same manner as a traditional outdoor gas grill. The manufacturers claim that it combines the convenience of an outdoor gas grill with the flavor and cooking techniques of a charcoal and wood grill.

In addition to providing the cooking heat, the gas burners in a hybrid grill can be used to quickly start a charcoal/wood fire or to extend the length of a charcoal/wood cooking session.

 Parts

Many gas grill components can be replaced with new parts, adding to the useful life of the grill. Though charcoal grills can sometimes require new cooking grids and charcoal grates, gas grills are much more complex, and require additional components such as burners, valves, and heat shields.

 Burners

Drawing of an ‘H’ Style Dual Burner

A gas grill burner is the central source of heat for cooking food. Gas grill burners are typically constructed of:

  • stainless steel
  • aluminized steel
  • cast iron (occasionally porcelain-coated)

Burners are hollow with gas inlet holes and outlet ‘ports’. For each inlet is a separate control on the control panel of the grill. The most common type of gas grill burners are called ‘H’ burners and resemble the capital letter ‘H’ turned on its side. Another popular shape is oval. There are also ‘Figure 8’, ‘Bowtie’ and ‘Bar’ burners. Other grills have a separate burner for each control. These burners can be referred to as ‘Pipe’, ‘Tube’, or ‘Rail’ burners. They are mostly straight since they are only required to heat one portion of the grill.

Gas is mixed with air in venturi tubes or simply ‘venturis’. Venturis can be permanently attached to the burner or removable. At the other end of the venturi is the gas valve, which is connected to the control knob on the front of the grill.

A metal screen covers the fresh air intake of each venturi.

 Cooking grid

Cooking grids, also known as cooking grates, are the surface on which the food is cooked in a grill. They are typically made of:

  • Stainless steel (Usually the most expensive and longest-lasting option, may carry a lifetime warranty)
  • Porcelain-coated cast iron (The next best option after stainless, usually thick and good for searing meat)
  • Porcelain-coated steel (Will typically last as long as porcelain-coated cast iron, but not as good for searing)
  • Cast Iron (More commonly used for charcoal grills, cast iron must be constantly covered with oil to protect it from rusting)
  • Chrome-plated steel (Usually the least expensive and shortest-lasting material)

Many refer to a cooking grid’s front to back dimension as ‘width’ and the side to side dimension as ‘length.’ Alternate terminology defines the ‘depth’ of a cooking grid as measured from to front back and the ‘width’ as measured from side to side.

Typically all the cooking grids when used on either gas or charcoal barbecues will allow fat and oil to drop between the grill bars, which will cause flare up where flames can burn and blacken food long before it is safely cooked.

To reduce the occurrence of flare up, many barbecues employ methods to prevent oil or fat dropping onto the heat source (gas burners or charcoal) by fitting the plates, baffles or other products to intercept the dripping flameable fluids.

A new patented product in 2009 addresses this flare up problem with Porcelain-coated steel ( dish washer safe ) grids which despite being open bars, have been designed to safely channel oil and fat into a collection tray, virtually eliminating the cause of flare-ups. The Grillstream Grills will sit on any existing type of barbecue and produce the same results when used in the domestic oven or kitchen grill.

Rock grate

Rock grates are placed directly above the burner and are designed to hold lava rock or ceramic briquettes. These materials serve a dual purpose – they protect the burner from drippings which can accelerate the deterioration of the burner, and they disperse the heat from the burner more evenly throughout the grill.

 Heat shield

Heat shields are also known as burner shields, heat plates, heat tents, radiation shields, or heat angles. They serve the same purpose as a rock grate and rock, protecting the burner from corrosive meat drippings and dispersing heat. They are more common in newer grills. Heat shields are lighter, easier to replace and harbor less bacteria than rocks.

Like lava rock or ceramic briquettes, heat shields also vaporize the meat drippings and ‘infuse’ the meat with more flavor.

Valves

Valves can wear out or become rusted and too difficult to operate, thus requiring replacement. A valve is unlike a burner in that a replacement usually must match exactly to the original in order to fit properly. Therefore, many grills are disposed of when valves fail, due to a lack of available replacements.

If a valve seems to be moving properly, but no gas is getting to the burner, the most common cause for this is debris in the venturi. This impediment can be cleared by using a long flexible object.

 Indoor grills

While live-fire cooking is difficult indoors without heavy-duty ventilation, it is possible to simulate some of the effects of a live-fire grill with indoor equipment. The simplest design is known as a grill pan, which is a type of heavy frying pan with raised grill lines to hold the food off the floor of the pan and allow drippings to run off. Though they have only become popular since the 1990s, such pans are widely recommended for apartment dwellers and people who live in areas where outdoor cooking is impractical for weather reasons

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